Trust-Based Relational Intervention

TBRI® is an attachment-based, trauma-informed intervention that is designed to meet the complex needs of vulnerable children. TBRI® uses Empowering Principles to address physical needs, Connecting Principles for attachment needs, and Correcting Principles to disarm fear-based behaviors. While the intervention is based on years of attachment, sensory processing, and neuroscience research, the heartbeat of TBRI® is connection. [More…]

Empowered to Connect

Empowered to Connect Parent Training equips parents with a holistic understanding of their child’s needs and development while empowering them with the tools and strategies to effectively meet those needs, build trust, and help their child heal and grow. The training is taught from a Christian perspective and focuses on a range of topics and issues relevant to adoptive and foster parents, including helping parents understand the impact of their child’s history, what they themselves bring to the parent-child relationship, the fundamentals of attachment, the impact of fear, and the importance of meeting their child’s sensory processing, nutritional, and other processing needs. [More…]

Trauma Competent Caregiver

Orphans and vulnerable children have experienced traumatic events in their lives, such as abandonment, loss, abuse and neglect. These forms of trauma have the potential to impact every developmental area of a growing child. It can change a child at the core of who they are, impacting how they communicate, attach and behave. Due to past trauma, orphans and vulnerable children have unique needs requiring intentional caregiving strategies. [More…]

Sensory

This list is not to be used as the absolute diagnostic criteria for labeling children with sensory processing disorder. But rather, as an educational tool and checklist for your own knowledge. Professionals who can diagnose this disorder have their own tools in addition to checklists to observe and test for sensory integration dysfunction. Please understand the “Five Caveats” that Carol Stock Kranowitz points out in her book, “The Out-Of-Sync Child” (1995), about using a checklist such as this. [More…]